Sarah O'Connor

Writer – Playwright – Cannot Save You From The Robot Apocalypse

“People love an idea, even if they don’t know what to do with it. Even if they only know how to do exactly the wrong thing,” (Machado 228). In her memoir, Carmen Maria Machado finds the words, after years and difficulty, to articulate what it was like being in an abusive same-sex relationship. Part fairy-tale, horror …

Continue reading

“Self-sacrifice remains the only fate imaginable for women. More precisely, it is a self-sacrifice that operates by way of abandoning one’s own creative potential rather than it’s realization,” (Chollet 83). Feminist writer Mona Chollet explores which type of women were accused of witchcraft in history and how that has adapted to the modern world. Looking particularly at …

Continue reading

“I fear that I’m bitter. I’m too young to be bitter. Especially as a result of a life that people supposedly envy. And I fear that I resent my mother. The person I have lived for. My idol. My role model. My one true love,” (McCurdy 120). Former child actor Jennette McCurdy reveals all about …

Continue reading

“The end of the world has been happening, and subsequently not happening, since people could make shit up,” (Goh 3). Katie Goh’s short book of essays on apocalypse fiction is timely and masterfully executed. Offering insight into many different examples of apocalypse fiction, it’s clear that Goh is passionate about this subject and put all her …

Continue reading

I received this book from The Next Best Book Club in exchange for an honest review. “Language is a cross-cultural love story of chatty merchants, violated verb conjugations, insolvent loan words, and forgotten Latin declensions. Language is a giant swingers party where slang swaps partners with grammar. Language is an hourglass of human culture, a vivid ekphrasis …

Continue reading

“I think it is critical that non-Indigenous Canadians be aware of how deeply the Indian Act penetrated, controlled, and continues to control, most aspects of the lives of First Nations. It is an instrument of oppression,” (Joseph 4). I didn’t learn about residential schools until I was in university and to this day I’m grateful for my …

Continue reading

“These letters, and the people who wrote them, were a lifeline for me, an antidote, a cure for the sudden stillness of the wheels under me,” (Coyote 5). During the beginning of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, Ivan Coyote found themselves grounded in Ontario after years of performing and speaking around the world. During this time, …

Continue reading

“We often use our belief in another person’s ‘resilience’ as an emotional shield. We protect ourselves from the discomfort, confusion, and helplessness we feel in the face of their trauma. It’s a kind of looking away; it lets our worldview go unchallenged and lets our life continue with minimal disruption,” (Perry 187). What Happened To …

Continue reading

I received this book from The Next Best Book Club in exchange for an honest review. “An act of faith. Faith—true faith—does not come without grappling in the shadows; faith never comes free from doubt” (Rauch 100). Sara Rauch is in a long-term relationship with a woman when she begins a low-residency MFA. While there, she finds …

Continue reading

A short little review for a cute little book. The Little Book of Witchcraft is a lovely introduction into the world of witchcraft for beginners or anyone who has ever been curious about the beliefs of witchcraft. Carvel’s book gives a brief history on witchcraft, giving glimpses into the European witch hunts, the Salem Witch Trials, as …

Continue reading