Sarah O'Connor

Writer – Playwright – Cannot Save You From The Robot Apocalypse

“I don’t want to talk about the rain or the trees or the…guilt I feel every single minute of every single day. And if I write it all down, I want to do it in pencil so I can rub it straight back out again, erasing that whole part of my life so it smudges …

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” Are you a Christian?’ Ilonka finally asked. ‘No, I am dying.” Anya turned a page. “Dead people have no religion,’” (Pike 4). Ilonka Pawluk has checked-in to Rotterham Home, a hospice for teenagers, typically state wards, who are soon to die. But Ilonka is different, she’s taking better care of herself, and once her …

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“The Victoria Station burns so ferociously that the man with the binoculars can feel the heat from his perch in the helicopter,” (Ames 1). Anxiety-ridden Riley Kowalski is spending her winter break in Antarctica after answering an advertisement that popped up on her Instagram feed. Sponsored by SladeTech, one of the world’s biggest tech companies owned …

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“We are restless people by nature. We roam, from one house to another, one city to the next. There is a limit to how long we can stay somewhere before people start to notice,”(Moore 13). Seventeen-year-old Pieta, or as she’s called Pie, is invisible. Not in the metaphorical sense, but really truly invisible. She is …

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I received this book from The Next Best Book Club in exchange for an honest review. “Sometimes I think we wound people just to see if we’re capable of wounding them. Or maybe we do it to see if they’re capable of being wounded,” (Cromley 55). It’s 1990 and seventeen-year-old Kirby Russo has finally found peace. Attending …

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“Shame is a way of life here. It’s stocked in the vending machines, stuck like gum under desks, spoken in the morning devotionals,” (McQuiston 288). Four years after moving with her moms from sunny California to False Beach, Alabama and attending Willowgrove Christian Academy, Chloe Green is so close to winning she can almost taste …

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“Before it was over, the murders would claim the lives of seventeen people of different ages and backgrounds. All would be discovered with similar wounds: their throats slit or their wrists cut. A few sustained deep cuts to the inner thigh. Each of the victims died from blood loss, yet each of the crime scenes …

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“We were sisters. We felt each other’s pain. We caused each other’s pain. We knew the smell of each other’s morning breath. We made each other cry. We made each other laugh. We got angry, pinched, kicked, screamed at each other. We kissed, on the forehead, nose on nose, butterfly eyelashes swept against cheeks…We possessed …

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I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. “‘Here I am, God,’ she prayed. But what am I here for?” (Denny 20). In 2019 Peri Fuller is just about to start school at Harvard University when she finds a hairpin with a strange symbol engraved on it on the beaches …

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“It sounds wild, I know, but racism is a spectrum and they all participate in it in some way. They don’t all have white hoods or call us mean things… But racism isn’t just about that – it’s not about being nice or mean. Or good versus bad. It’s bigger than that,” (Àbíké-Íyímídé 166). At …

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